Weight Lifting Charts and a Definitive Article on Keeping the Weight Off

I have two things to share with you this evening.  The first are some weight lifting charts I designed, and the second is an incredible article in Runners World by their editor at large Amby Burfoot.  I will cover the article first.

In the current issue of Runners World, April 2015,  the article A Weight-Loss Manifesto appears under Amby’s byline.  He has done his homework,  and written what amounts to a meta analysis conveyed in laypersons terms, on the science of weight loss,  There is a special emphasis on keeping the weight off which is, I think, harder than loosing it.  Like any magazine Runners World can run hot and cold.  This months issue, “The Weight-Loss Special,”  is one of the better ones. Now to those weight lifting charts I promised.

Through aging and by running I have lost some muscle mass.  So, I have started to get serious about weight training. I don’t want to bulk up, but I do want to stay functionally strong, and to tone.  Since I started to get serious about weight training I have been on a quest for the perfect weight lifting chart to keep track of progress.  I am a big fan of using metrics for fitness.

I had little success in finding a chart that made sense for me.  So I designed one for myself.  I have always liked the little half size clipboards for trips to the gym or even just working out at home.  They fit inside a gym bag and seem to be just the right size. Here is what my rig looks like with an older version of the form:

FullSizeRender

These half-sized clipboards are perfect for workouts at home or in the gym.

Below is the chart design I am currently using.  It is more generic than the previous one.

weight lifting chart portraitI make some copies and cut each copy in half.

I would prefer one with three workout routines per page, instead of two (after the chart is cut in half) but the lines just get too small and I really like that little half size clipboard.  But, I made a full size version, portrait orientation instead of landscape, for anybody that wants to use it. It has two rows of three workouts each.   Here is what it looks like:

weight lifting chart landscapeHere is a link to one of my cloud files where I keep the originals, and a pdf version of each one.  The files were created with Libre Office and are in .odt format.  I prefer open source software and the Linux operating system.  Besides Linux, Libre Office is available for Mac, and Windows.

My  next article will be on the perfect weight lifting setup for home, and some suggested resources.

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One thought on “Weight Lifting Charts and a Definitive Article on Keeping the Weight Off

  1. Pingback: Strength Training on a Budget: The Minimalist Weight Lifter | Running Ugly

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